Galaverna

Galaverna is a platform for multimedia, sound-and-art productions based in Italy that mainly operates in the area of electroacoustic and experimental music, with a specific referral to the landscape/soundscape aesthetics.

Galaverna comes as a sister label of Laverna, a net label working under Creative Commons licences, active in the field since the early '90s in creating multimedia productions and live performances that combine music, visuals and words.

Galaverna is run by Enrico Coniglio and Leandro Pisano.

Aims

Galaverna is not a record label, it’s not just a net label either and it doesn’t operate in the marketplace.

Galaverna, as a music label, is a digital label ONLY. We decided that our planet is already filled enough with plastic, so, please, do not burn our music on CD-Rs.

Galaverna releases only a work per season (exceptions allowed).

In a world where musical industry is inevitably fading and illegal downloads are taking over, Galaverna aims to be a model of ethical behavior.

In a world overloaded with music, Galaverna aims to be a model of ethical behavior for artists. Our motto is: RELEASE LESS, SAVE MORE.

Please note that

Galaverna’s main goal is to bring the degrowth concept into music (in French: décroissance, in Spanish: decrecimiento, in Italian: decrescita). As we reached a point where the production of material goods seems to be set on a path of ever-increasing growth, and even if an everlasting growth has been the capitalistic systems goal for over a century, it has now become crucial to adopt a more sustainable lifestyle. To bring these considerations into the music field means to curb both the unlimited production of music as well as the consumption itself. We believe behaviours so closely related to the logic of consumerism must be eliminated in order to devote ourselves to the true, caring and deep experience of music making/listening.

Artists involved in Galaverna must agree to this.

Joseph Sannicandro “a sea without a port” out now

We are proud to announce that "a sea without a port" by Joseph Sannicandro is out now. Click on the image below to go to the release page.

Next release in Galaverna by Joseph Sannicandro

It's with great pleasure that we annunce the next release in Galaverna will be by Joseph Sannicandro. With his work he has investigated a hidden side of Mexico.  In his ...
Read more...

David Velez “The birds of Nilo” out now

Here in Galaverna we are proud to announce that "The birds of Nilo" by David Velez is out now. Click on the image below to go to the release page.

Next release in Galaverna by David Velez

We're so excited to announce that, on the next 21st September, Galaverna will release "The birds of Nilo", a work by David Velez,  sound artist and composer, also co-founder and director of the Impulsive Habitat netlabel and ...
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    a sea without a port Joseph Sannicandro

    cat: gal 0124
    date:  21 dec 2015
     
    time:  55:25

    download as: 

    AIF [514,6 MiB]

    MP3 [125,4 MiB]

     

    A sea without a port 

    Though we know it is big, and can see its size on maps, we don’t really perceive its size. Like an ocean, we only see part of the megacity of Mexico, and so Mexico-Tenochtitlan is spoken of as infinite, boundless, limitless. So vast as to be unknowable, beyond comprehension.  In reality though, Mexico City is not infinite. It has a beginning and an end. Patterns repeat themselves throughout the urban fabric. The city’s history is written on its walls and in the rubbish along its storm drains, in the names of subway stations and the little white crosses marking deaths on the street. The way to know something too big to perceive is through its parts.

    This is how Feike de Jong,  a journalist, researcher, musician and conceptual artist, frames his project to walk around the entire 800km-long perimeter of Mexico City. (The Guardian)  De Jong also employs a metaphor of seafaring which resonates with my own approach to the city so much that I’m glad I didn’t come across his story until after I had completed composing a sea without a port.  I tend to approach recording in a casual way, capturing interesting sounds I come across with whatever I happen to have on hand.  But my practice is also informed by psychogeography, and so there is an overarching (if wandering) narrative to this record.

    Mexico occupies a complicated place in the American popular imagination.  As a tourist destination, Mexico evokes beautiful seaside resorts and great food, friendly locals and an opportunity to lower one’s inhibitions.  Then there is the other Mexico, the post-colonial Mexico, the Mexico rocked by the effects of NAFTA, of sprawling slums and terrible poverty, of colonized peoples and traditional ways of life obliterated by the violence of multinational corporations and agricultural subsidies.  But there is also the revolutionary Mexico: Benito Juárez, Pancho Villa, the Mexican Muralists, the Zapatistas, organized indigenous resistance, the many courageous Campesinos, workers, and students with a rich tradition of fighting injustice and on behalf of the oppressed.  As our southern neighbor, there is the uncomfortable fact that so much of what is now the USA was once Mexico, the forgotten/repressed/unknown fact that much of the Mexican-American war was fought because Mexico had outlawed slavery. The fact that European settlement was forced on the indigenous peoples.  Bigots and TV pundits cultivate fear of “illegal” immigrants,  yet ironically  Mexico has long been perceived as a place where American ruffians and outlaws could flee to escape justice.

    And then there is Mexico City (or el DF), the sprawling capital.  One of the world’s great mega-cities, with some population estimates in excess of 20 million inhabitants. Whereas NYC has 5 burroughs, Mexico City has 16, each containing many, many distinct neighborhoods.  Whole villages and cities have been swallowed up by the cities constant growth.   It is by far the largest city in  the Western hemisphere, a cosmopolitan place that runs the gamut from high culture to folk, from Haussmann-style architecture to Modern to the informal dwellings of its slums and back again.  Prior to colonization, it was the site of the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan, the largest city of the Pre-Colombian Americas, rivaling the largest cities of Europe at that time.   Upon first laying eyes on the city Bernal Díaz del Castillo,  a foot soldier of the conquistador Hernán Cortés, remarked that  “Tenochtitlan is a second Venice.”  At that time the city was in the middle of a great lake, a series of islands connected by unique boats.  A distant echo of this floating empire can still be heard in-between the hedonistic celebrations of students and tourists in  Xochimilco. For years before first visiting DF, I had heard rumors of this incredible city, of the vibrancy of the art scene, the active literary public sphere, its cafes, street food, and especially its music.  Finally experiencing the city for myself both confirmed these reports while proving that no amount of stories will ever prepare you for the vastness of the city.  It’s sprawl, the ubiquitous 7-11s, the vendors hawking goods, bustling markets, wild parties, art galleries, boutiques, modern architecture, political posters, cramped metro, dog parks, endless traffic, and music everywhere, from musicians on the streets to kids selling bootlegs with stereo systems strapped to their backs.

    These recordings acknowledge the impossibility of ever truly knowing a place, especially one as rich and complex and contradictory as el DF.  As an American tourist, my relationship to Mexico is even more complicated, as much mediated by imagination as by reality.  Rather than pretend to be objective or scientific, this work embraces these contractions. This is a work about the space of encounter, in all its forms. Untreated field-recordings are rarely left so for long, refracted and looped and processed, moving back and forth between a dream and reality until the two are indistinguishable.  We listen not only to the rich street life, bustling metro trains, and vibrant public spaces, but also, and with great respect, towards the rich literature, music, culture, and history of the city and its peoples.  [Joseph Sannicandro] 

    Credits 

    Most of the recordings were made around Mexico City (especially Roma, Condesa, Zona Rosa, Centro, Tepito, San Miguel Chapultepec, Benito Juárez, Coyoacán, Xochimilco, Tenochtitlan, the Airport, but also many other places)

    Made with: TASCAM DR-05, iPhone 3GS, a cheap portable tape player,  Tape loops, SP-404, Memory Man looper, Effects pedals (chorus, echo, fuzz, freeze), Technics tape deck, and Mackie 1202 mixer.

    Thank you: Ana Lucia Soto, Sergio Su, Marco de la Torre, Daniel Castrejón and Umor Rex, Jorge Amigo, Héctor Ortiz and his whole family, Myrdal SoundLAB, Cam and Alex and their whole crew, Grant Cogswell at Under The Volcano Books, Julian Bonequi, Audition Records, and everyone else who helped us out and showed us around or gave us advice.  And  to  Roberto Bolaño, Juan Villoro, Leon Trotsky, Frida Kahlo, Francis Alÿs, Alejandro González Iñárritu, Octavio Paz, Rufino Tamayo and all the artists and writers who introduced me to DF long before I physically set foot there.

    Photo cover by Sara Mericle

    ------

    Joseph Sannicandro is a writer and scholar currently based in Minneapolis, where he is pursuing a PhD in Cultural Studies. He is co-founder of acloserlisten.com, and runs the Lost Children net label.  He also records under the moniker the new objective and under his own name.

    Creative Commons License

    A sea without a port by Joseph Sannicandro is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
    Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at www.galaverna.org.

    REVIEWS

    coming.

    Next release in Galaverna by Joseph Sannicandro

    It’s with great pleasure that we annunce the next release in Galaverna will be by Joseph Sannicandro. With his work he has investigated a hidden side of Mexico.  In his words: “As an American tourist, my relationship to Mexico is complicated, as much mediated by imagination as by reality. Rather than pretend to be objective or scientific, this work embraces these contractions. Untreated field-recordings are rarely left so for long, refracted and looped and processed, moving back and forth between a dream and reality until the two are indistinguishable. We listen not only to the rich street life, bustling metro trains, and vibrant public spaces, but also, and with great respect, towards the rich literature, music, culture, and history of the city and its peoples”.

    Joseph Sannicandro is a writer and scholar currently based in Minneapolis, where he is pursuing a PhD in Cultural Studies. He is co-founder of acloserlisten.com, and runs the Lost Children net label. He also records under the moniker the new objective and under his own name.

    (Pict by J. Sannicandro )

    The birds of Nilo David Velez

    cat: gal 0123
    date:  21 sept  2015
     
    time: 45:02

    download as:

    AIF [420,7 MiB]

    MP3 [102,8 MiB]

     

    The birds of Nilo  How can sound narrate a territory otherwise? How do ‘liminal’ or ‘marginal’ spaces ‘sound like’? How do sound and silence interact with each other in ‘liminal’ contexts? How do sound and vision (and/or invisibility) interact with each other? All these questions emerge while listening to David Velez’s intimate sound analysis on “The Birds of Nilo”, a tiny and deep reflection on the nature of XXI century soundscape seen from a “narrow creek close to the Pagüey River where many birds gathered early in the morning and sang their tunes”, as the author writes in the complement notes of this release.

    These recordings remind us that it’s important to question the macro-concept of the soundscape as a “masterpiece of nature”, interpreting it as a sonic environment but and not as something that is perceivable in terms of an aesthetic unity within a sonic context.

    Velez writes: “The crowded vegetation around the creek, the low air density caused by the high temperatures and the multitude of singing birds produced an immersive experience where I perceived the birds as vortexes of a room while the reverberating trees worked as walls.”

    We can listen to this polyphonic and complex soundscape as a series of sonic events that are hybrid, blurred and fluid and not considering them as a simple orchestra or an harmonic picture of reality.

    Velez pushes our perception over the limits of a stereotypical categorization of soundscape, building a sonic space where we can interrogate ourselves about intricacy, spatial depth, architecture and geometry of a place.

    ‘When you walk 25-30 feet above ground, it is a miracle, because you are still in the city… but you are flying above the city. You are in the middle of trees, and that is a moment of beauty’.  A sense of beauty that is also a possibility of a critical engagement with acoustic space and the proposition of a possible different approach to the soundscape.

     

    Notes from the artist  'The birds of Nilo' is a sequence of six recordings captured in the small municipality of Nilo in the department of Cundinamarca (Colombia) whose average temperature of 27º C (81º F), ranks among the highest in the country. The material was captured in a narrow creek close to the Pagüey River where many birds gathered early in the morning and sang their tunes.

    The crowded vegetation around the creek, the low air density caused by the high temperatures and the multitude of singing birds produced an immersive experience where I perceived the birds as vertexes of a room while the reverberating trees worked as walls. This aesthetic approximation to acoustic spatial depth where architectural and geometric patterns are used to read a natural place is what I wanted to develop and articulate on this release.

    "When you walk 25-30 feet above ground, it is a miracle, because you are still in the city… but you are flying above the city. You are in the middle of trees, and that is a moment of beauty." – Renzo Piano


    Thanks to Enrico Coniglio and Leandro Pisano.

    Photo cover: Lina Velandia
    www.linamariavelandia.com

    Dedicated to my dad Alvaro Vélez who introduced me to sound and architecture.

     

    Creative Commons License
    The birds of Nilo by David Velez is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
    Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at www.galaverna.org.

    REVIEWS

    LOOP.CL

    Colombian sound artist David Vélez offers a sequence of six recordings captured in the small town of Nile, in the department of Cundinamarca, Colombia. Vélez recently made a piece for the Tsonami Festival held in November each year in Valparaíso, Chile which was broadcast on Radio Valentin Letelier of this port city. The material of "The Birds of the Nile" was captured in a narrow creek near the river Pagüey where many birds gather early in the morning and sing their songs. Vélez explores the interaction that occurs in "marginal" areas and how it interacts sound and silence. The soundscape reveals this relationship comprising a wide range of sounds rich in colors and hues. [Guillermo Escudero]

    BEACH SLOTH

    Contemplative to its very core, David Velez’s “The birds of Nilo” is a small celebration of nature. Eschewing any filtering the piece is a bright brilliant beautiful recording of birds simply singing to their hearts’ content. By letting the songs form so organically with barely a noticeable trace of editing the piece feels absolutely at peace. Teeming with life the songs simply reverberate in the air. Various themes return again and again into the mix revealing a sense of purpose amongst these happy healthy and free creatures. Fading into perception the birds start in medias res. No buildup or anything the sound begins right in the flux. Carefully selected the sounds simply occupy and own the space. David Velez is merely a visitor to their private world. Kept quiet the songs of the birds are woven together quite masterfully. The size is emphasized as the birds elaborate on the giganticness of the territory. Hence songs simply grow in scope and size until finally they simply come to a close. Variety is of the utmost importance and here David Velez is quite good at picking out the specific moments to emphasize further. Beneath the singing of the birds deeper undercurrents of sound take hold more than willing to further punctuate the piece with additional stylistic flair. Upon completion of a particular section David Velez manages to create pitch perfect transitions as the album changes focus. Strangely moving and deeply calming, David Velez documents a teeming environment on the active “The birds of Nilo”.



    Next release in Galaverna by David Velez

    We’re so excited to announce that, on the next 21st September, Galaverna will release “The birds of Nilo”, a work by David Velez,  sound artist and composer, also co-founder and director of the Impulsive Habitat netlabel and founder of The Field Reporter web magazine.

    As in the artist’s statement : <<“The birds of Nilo” is a sequence of six recordings captured in the small municipality of Nilo in the department of Cundinamarca (Colombia) whose average temperature of 27º C (81º F), ranks among the highest in the country. The material was captured in a narrow creek close to the Pagüey River where many birds gathered early in the morning and sang their tunes>>.

    Matins d’Ariège Stéphane Marin (Espaces Sonores)

     

    cat: gal 0122
    date:  6 aug 2015
     
    time: 39:57 

    download as:

    AIF [361,0 MiB]

    MP3 [132,4 MiB]

    Matins d'Ariège Listening to a soundscape means to engage with the historical and geographical specificity of a landscape through a sonic practice. As George Revill has written, “such an approach is informed by a recognition of the always already context dependence of communicative utterance and a notion of sensing as simultaneously affective and reflective, an embodied process of making sense”. This is a perspective that emerges from many soundworks focused on an “intimate, elementary and ecological auscultation” of a place, as Stéphane Marin’s “Matins d'Ariège” is.

    This work can be defined as an attempt to draw “a kind of non-nostalgic "souvenir" which invites the listeners to experience the specific vibrations and the deep energy wich overfows from these simple rural sonic spaces”, as Marin writes. The author tries here to “to share another angle of listening, another "regard", on an intimate countryside world. This landscape that seems familiar at first glance but only before the phonographic framework offers us the vision of a less generic rurality, more dramatic, more fantasmatic, more powerful”.

    “Matins d'Ariège” is a binaural work floating between abstract and concrete atmospheres, built on different composition techniques: raw and recomposed field recordings. It opens an imaginary space where it’s possible to deal with the possible sonic worlds activated by a listening process created in a specific place, Ariège in the Pyrenees mountains. A place “to be (in France) for decreasing”, one of the infinite small corners where to ask about planetary processes of capitalism: “Would you take the time to decrease with us all the way to the end?”

    Notes from the artist  MATINS D'ARIÈGE is an intimate, elementary and ecological auscultation of the place I used to live in Ariège (Pyrénnées - France). A kind of non-nostalgic "souvenir" which invites the listeners to experience the specific vibrations and the deep energy wich overfows from these  simple rural sonic spaces.  I'm trying here to share another angle of listening, another "regard", on an intimate countryside world. This landscape that seems familiar at first glance but only before the phonographic framework offers us the vision of a less generic rurality, more dramatic, more fantasmatic, more powerful !  This binaural work is balanced between abstract and concrete sonic propositions and between "raw" and recomposed field recordings. All the tracks are linked with one (or more) of our (western) 4 elements.  Ariège is the place to be (in France) for decreasing... Would you take the time to decrease with us all the way to the end ? Really… to the end ?!.

     ///////// Matins d'Ariège is carbon-free…  No plane and no car have been used to record it !  All recordings were made between 2013 and 2014 in the village of  Fabas (Parc Régional des Pyrénnées Ariégeoises, France)  mostly with binaural or contact microphones :  please experience it (only) on your (best) headphones ! "Matins d'Ariège" was composed between october 2014 and february 2015.  

    /////////  Thanks to Enrico Coniglio, Patrick Mc Ginley, Daniel Crockaert, Pali Meursault, Marc Namblard, Felix Blume, Miguel Isaza, and Luis Antero for their careful listenings and their precious reviews.

     /////////  http://www.espaces-sonores.com/ Recording / Composition / Mastering / Photos : Stéphane MARIN

     /////////  On the border between listening to the soundscape and "in situ" compositions, in the porosity proposed by a work who rubs the real, Stéphane MARIN's artistic, ecological and spiritual paths approching each day a little closer to the silence.

     

    Creative Commons License
    Matins d'Ariège by Stéphane Marin is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
    Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://www.galaverna.org.

    REVIEWS

    BEACH SLOTH

    On “Matins d’Ariège” Stéphane MARIN takes the listener on a journey. This is not a metaphor this is the literal description. By letting the pieces simply represent their environments every beautiful and ugly sound the work feels like a series of moments. Editing throughout the pieces is crisp and the careful work documents the most important steps. With these pieces nicely working together what develops is a sense of narrative told through natural organic sound. The bouncing mechanical sounds that define “Bourrasques” feel particularly tactile. From the large door sounds to the careful zipping up to the birds songs everything feels oddly inviting. By far the highlight of the collection is the expansive expressive work of “Trois averses”. At times it becomes impossible to dissect exactly what is making such incredible sounds. Instead the simple soothing nature of it makes the piece compelling as does the quieter gentler moments. For “Bourrasque” the singular focus of the sound makes it divine. Nearly silent is the contemplative microscopic aural snippets found on “Dégel”. Volume is a must as the sounds bounce against each other ever so slowly and gently. Offering a sense of duality (of loud/silent) is the economic “Brûle la nuit” which closes off the collection. By letting the small sounds say such great things Stéphane MARIN displays the power of tiny gestures on “Matins d’Ariège”.

    PRIVATE REVIEW by Pedro Montesinos

    "Quand on commence à écouter "Matins d’Ariège", de Stéphane Marin ( Galaverna | approaching post-digital sound 2015­08­06) on plonge dans une expérience très particulière, tant par la technique binaurale de l’enregistrement (très réaliste et subtile, spécialement ­mais non exclusivement... ­ quand on utilise un bon casque), que pour l’objet à qui il est consacré: l’écoute créative de l’environnement. Dès les premiers sons, on démarre un parcours, en sept morceaux, qui nous mène par différents jeux de captation des sons, de l’acoustique des espaces à l’écoute environnementale de la nature. Mais aussi, ce travail nous permet un genre de dérive par le biais de notre mémoire propre, par nos expériences personnelles des environnements sonores et, finalement, par notre relation avec la nature même. Les arbres, la pluie et le vent; les oiseaux, les grillons et les mouches; mais aussi la maison, les fenêtres, les rideaux ou les moteurs des véhicules lointains, sont entendus, écoutés, enregistrés, traités, composés et mixés pour suggérer des endroits à la fois réels et imaginaires, pour récupérer des émotions vécues et presque oubliées, pour nous dévoiler des réflexions ouvertes. Parfois, on peut aussi tomber dans le délire qui nous mène dans un nouveaux paradis: celle de l’écoute active et libre où les sons peuvent se mélanger, s’opposer, se ressembler ou ne montrer qu'une part de soi, avant de disparaître ou de revenir complètement. Les fenêtres de “Bourrasques” frappent, abruptes, les oreilles en même temps que nous abritent des vents. Dans “Trois averses”, les différentes intensités des pluies nous éclaboussent ici et là. La rumeur du vent entre les branches et les feuilles des arbres et des arbustes grattent nos oreilles dans “Bourrasque”. La percussion sourde et imprévisible sort de son confinement pour se trouver avec les mouches et les oiseaux en plein air dans “L’Inquiet”. Les pas sur le terrain se fondent avec le frottement des arbustes dans “Bourre”. Le presque inaudible chant de l’eau et le seau dans un puits imaginaire de “Dégel”. La pluie et le feu entremêlés, avant la sortie des oiseaux de “Brûle nuit”. Chacun, et tous ensemble, constituent, une invitation à l’imaginaire, et nous ramènent également à l’écoute des sons de l’environnement réel et partagé. Un matin, loin des urgences bruyantes, cacophoniques et sur-saturées de la vie urbaine." 

    MUSIC WON'T SAVE YOU

    Il soundscaping non è semplice descrizione superficiale dei luoghi, né descrizione di immagini statiche: è invece una fotografia in movimento, derivante da prolungata esposizione, che reca in sé non soltanto componenti “événementiel” bensì tracce della storia naturale e umana del luogo che intende rappresentare. Da questo approccio ha tratto le mosse lo sperimentatore francese Stéphane Marin per i quaranta minuti di “Matins d’Ariège”, che attraverso una combinazione di materiale sonoro concreto e astratto intendono offrire una particolare prospettiva dei luoghi pirenaici propri della biografia dell’artista. Suoni atmosferici e field recordings naturalistici, oltre a una congerie di rumori e frammenti acusmatici popolano le sette istantanee delle quali si compone il lavoro che, appunto come fotografie, sono il frutto di tempi di esposizione sonora diversi e come tali sono presentate, in brani che vanno da nemmeno trenta secondi a oltre un quarto d’ora di durata. Sature burrasche meteorologiche e sequenze di elettricità statica, estatici canti d’uccelli e vibrazioni sinistre popolano l’intero itinerario descritto da “Matins d’Ariège”, non uniforme al pari del territorio descritto, cristallizzato in microcosmi auditivi tale da mantenere elevata l’attenzione dell’ascolto. Il soundscaping di Marin risulta così in una rappresentazione dinamica, spogliata da ogni affettazione romantica ma non per questo fonte di soli stimoli intellettuali.

    SYNTONE

    Avertissement – Lectrices, lecteurs, écoutez donc Matins d’Ariège avant de lire ce qui suit : y sont décrits des secrets de fabrication que vous n’apprécierez que si vos oreilles s’en sont d’abord passées. Et si vous avez un casque à proximité, utilisez-le, afin d’entendre le son dans toute sa spatialité et sa matérialité. D’emblée, Matins d’Ariège nous fait basculer dans un autre corps. Nous devenons une maison dont quelqu’un ferme, l’un après l’autre, les lourds volets, pendant que dehors la bourrasque fait rage. À moins que nous ne soyons ce quelqu’un – l’auteur ? – ou bien un fantôme distinct, entré par effraction via une brèche sonore. Peu importe. Soudain nous respirons au rythme de ces ouvertures et fermetures au vent. De nos oreilles il est à peine question. Nous sommes engouffré⋅e⋅s dans la matière, le métal tambouriné par la tempête, les bois qui grincent, qui glissent, les blocs d’air qui foncent, inlassables, les protections où l’on s’emmitoufle. Puis un volet s’ouvre sur l’accalmie et les textures fines, bruissantes, du matin. Vous voulez du paysage sonore rural, nous dit Stéphane Marin, en voilà un peu. Mais juste le temps de récupérer votre souffle et de vous préparer aux averses qui arrivent – ou plutôt, à tout ce qui se passe à l’intérieur de ces différentes averses. Est-on dans du field recording ou dans un rêve, dans le village de Fabas ou dans une fiction ? Tout cela en même temps. Chaque objet, chaque geste, chaque élément de l’atmosphère, chargé d’une longue histoire humaine, est un point de départ vers l’imaginaire. Matins d’Ariège est la dernière parution du netlabel1 italien Galaverna, dont « l’objet principal est d’introduire le concept de décroissance dans le milieu de la musique ». Une seule parution par saison, en haute qualité numérique, qui donne longtemps à écouter et à songer. Stéphane Marin, qui définit sa démarche comme « artistique, écologique et spirituelle »2, était tout indiqué pour livrer celle de l’été 2015. Par ailleurs fondateur de la compagnie Espaces sonores, spécialisée dans les « créations sonores contextuelles », il propose ici « une intime auscultation élémentaire d’un ancien lieu de vie ». Les prises de son binaurales, par hydrophones et micros contact font partie de ses outils pour réaliser ce portrait narratif d’un hameau qui chamboule les frontières du field recording. Sept pistes au rythme et à la temporalité propres (de vingt-huit secondes à plus de quinze minutes), employant des techniques distinctes (« des prises de son brutes ou recomposées »), et qui se font écho de multiples manières. Stephane_Marin_Matins_d_Ariege_Averses_CC_by-nc-nd_big Stéphane Marin, « Averses », Creative Commons by-nc-nd Mais revenons aux averses. Trois, nous dit le titre de la piste, comme dans un traité de typologie pluviale. Et elles sont en effet l’occasion d’expérimentations scientifiques et musicales. L’approche, attentive aux tonalités diverses de la pluie selon sa dynamique du moment et selon les matériaux qu’elle rencontre, fait songer notamment au travail de Luis Antero autour des rivières et ruisseaux3. Un micro binaural sur la tête du compositeur, deux hydrophones posés sur différentes lattes d’une chaise en bois, le tout relié à une petite console de terrain qui a permis de mixer leurs amplitudes respectives en direct4. Il nous semble entendre simultanément chaque goutte distincte et l’averse dans son ensemble – avec l’impression d’entrer ainsi dans les entrailles des éléments, dans leur mécanique secrète. Ici la pluie, avant, l’air, ensuite la terre et le feu. Les gestes les plus simples deviennent des évènements gigantesques dans cette cosmogonie du quotidien : une bâche tendue dont on vide l’eau et c’est tout l’espace sonore qui se recompose. Stéphane Marin est à l’affût de ce qu’il nomme « la poétique de la banalité ». Matins d’Ariège tisse des mystères et des évidences – le moindre son plein à craquer de toutes ses significations possibles et des mille narrations, acoustiques, géologiques, animales, émotionnelles, sacrées, qui le lient aux autres sons. Charge à celle ou celui qui écoute d’inventer le rituel où ils prennent place. C’est cette charge mythologique sous-jacente, jamais explicite, qui distingue par exemple « Dégel », où l’on entend le travail de la glace au printemps, des compositions sur le même thème d’Andreas Bick ou Marc Namblard : la couche gelée dit autre chose que sa musicalité ou sa dynamique, mais elle nous laisse libres de deviner ou d’inventer cette autre chose. La densité et la matérialité de Matins d’Ariège sont une affaire de micros, mais tout autant, sinon davantage, de symbolique. « L’inquiet » est particulièrement représentatif à cet égard : au cœur de la composition, la piste introduit un affect explicitement nommé, mais reste mystérieuse tant dans sa fabrication que dans l’interprétation à y apporter. La captation est l’une des plus retravaillées en studio : c’est le son, filtré et spatialisé, d’un lapin préoccupé par la présence d’un micro stéréo devant son clapier. Mais de savoir cela n’arrête en rien le questionnement produit par l’écoute. Est-ce une rime acoustique avec la glace du dégel ? Est-ce un moment du récit que l’on n’aurait pas encore saisi ? Plus l’on écoute et moins l’on sait, car c’est à nous de construire et déconstruire sans cesse ce récit. L’écoute se modifie au fil du temps : on réentend et on interprète différemment la piste précédente en fonction de celle qui se déroule. Les motifs reviennent, se font écho, se transforment mutuellement. Les craquèlements du feu résonnent comme des gouttes d’eau. Et puis tout à coup, le silence. De cela non plus on n’est pas sûr⋅e d’abord : peut-être le feu chuchote-t-il ? Peut-être n’écoute-t-on pas encore assez ? Peut-être faut-il plonger plus loin dans le son pour entendre ? Mais le lieu depuis lequel on écoute resurgit, et nous semble masquer ce qui se passe de l’autre côté du casque. Le silence fait pleinement partie de la composition, il s’y insère comme une épreuve initiatique, une ultime façon d’engager l’autre dans l’écoute. Et « celles et ceux qui savent aller au bout du silence », dit Stéphane Marin, qui savent « laisser courir la bande », tomberont sur son « invitée d’honneur, le symbole de la décroissance » : une limace occupée à franchir un micro contact. http://syntone.fr/songes-enfouis-des-matins-dariege 

    THEATRE OF NOISE

    It begins with a juddering of a window being buffeted in the wind, and then we are sucked out into a squall, wind swirling about us. To lock out the gale we slam doors closed, slide bolts on their supports, and latch squeaky shutters. Thunderous impacts alternate with the howling gale in a procession of inside/outside, far/near, dissipation/intensification. Literally and figuratively "Bourrasques" is an opening. It's a stunning way to commence Matins d'Ariège, a new release by Stéphane Marin. For two years Marin gathered sounds in the village of Fabas, embedded in the Pyrénnées Ariégeoises region of France, using mostly binaural and contact microphones. The results have been composed into a powerful evocation of place. These seven tracks are compact and efficient, demonstrating a highly tuned ear and a ruthless editing process. We get no tedious, indulgent soundscapes. (Though I also have time for those.) Everything lasts exactly as long as necessary; the emotional force of the composition is amplified as a result. "Trois averses" knits together the three rain showers of the title, into an expressive aleatoric catalogue. Each drop of liquid activates its environment. Towards the end of the track we hear insect stridulation and car tyres splashing in the puddles, as life on different scales ventures out of its hiding places. "Bourrasques" then returns, feet crunching through gravel, wind in the trees, gates creaking. But the context is different, and so our reception changes. In contrast to what has gone before, "L'Inquiet" evokes an interior landscape of geological significance, a low pass filter used to creative effect. The 28 seconds of "Bourre" is no padding, but a reprise of textures from two tracks previous. This insert demonstrates an overt, dramatic, compositional awareness. The artist describes this album as an "intimate, elementary and ecological auscultation of the place I used to live", fairly releasing reviewers such as myself from their descriptive obligations. So I will say nothing about "Brûle la nuit", exept that it is positioned at the end of this curated listening experience, where only it can be. Through overt technique and careful collation, Marin demonstrates how our own individual interventions in a landscape form that place as a response to our presence. No matter how intimately he knows the locale, Ariège did not come to Marin fully-formed, but as a variety of experiences and constraints that had to be navigated and shaped. With so many naive field recordings being offered up to our ears, it is refreshing to hear one that reflects this phenomenological truth. Galaverna is a digital music label based in Italy. It promotes an ethos of decrescita or sustainability by releasing only one work per season. If you were going to offer a single album every four months, then Matins d'Ariège would indeed be the one. Highly recommended. [Robert Parmar]

     

    Next release in Galaverna: “Matins d’Ariège” by Stéphane Marin

    We are happy to say that, after some troubles, Galaverna will release very soon a work by Stéphane Marin, soundscape artist involved in the promotion of the soundscape  culture and curator of the project Espaces Sonores.

    His forthcoming work is titled “Matins d’Ariège” and, in the words of the author himself, “is an intimate, elementary and ecological auscultation of the place I used to live in Ariège (Pyrénées – France). A kind of non-nostalgic “souvenir” which invites the listeners to experience the specific vibrations and the deep energy wich overfows from these  simple rural sonic spaces”.

    For more infos on Stéphane’s numerous activities see at espaces-sonores.com

     

    “Matins d’Ariège” is coming soon.